Keeping it Clean: Should I Use Soap on My Anus?

Soap? No Soap!! Get the PDF version of this article Soap may be an important part of one’s bathing routine, but do I need to wash my anus?  The short answer is no. The longer answer is also no!  To elaborate, would you clean your eye with soap?  The anus, although the butt of many

Anal Fissures: Lots of Pain, Many Causes

Ouch!  A Bowel Movement And Then Pain.  And Maybe Even Some Blood. Much has been written about anal fissures.  And just about everyone knows that the Proctologist, also known as a colon and rectal surgeon, is the person to see when you have a fissure.  We all know about the pain that comes with the

Medical Treatment for Anal Fissures

There Is A First Time For Everything. An anal fissure is one of life’s more painful conditions.  Often, excruciatingly painful.  And, for patients experiencing the fissure for the first time (yes, it can recur over and over again), the pain is made worse by lack of knowledge as to how to treat the fissure, and

Anal Fissures: The Right Diet to Avoid Surgery

The Anal Fissure.  This Diet Might Help. An anal fissure is like a paper cut that most people have had at one time or another.  The only difference is that unlike the paper cut between two fingers, the anal fissure is a cut or tear of the anal opening.  In fact, the painful anal fissure

Anal Fissures and Stress: How Are They Related

Why Do I Hurt?  What Is An Anal Fissure? “I have pain.”  “My rear end hurts!”  “It’s killing me!!!”   These are common complaints heard by every proctologist (also known as a colon and rectal surgeon or coloproctologist), every day in big cities. Big cities, stress and anal fissures.  Los Angeles.  Fissures.  All day, all week.

Do I Have Hemorrhoids or Anal Fissure? Ask a Proctologist

Hemorrhoids.  Fissures.  The Proctologist. Anal pain is common. Most often, the pain is transient. It comes and then it leaves just as quickly. But what happens when it comes, but doesn’t go? What happens when the pain lingers, intensifies and worsens? A trip to the proctologist (also known as a colon and rectal surgeon, or

5 Ways to Improve Your Digestive Health

You don’t need to undergo a diet overhaul to improve your digestive health. By making small changes in your diet and lifestyle habits, you can reduce your risk of getting anal fistulas and other uncomfortable colorectal conditions while maintaining better digestive health.

Healing Anal Fissure: At-home treatments to aid your recovery

With the help of your colorectal specialist in Beverly Hills and Culver City, an anal fissure will typically resolve within a few days or weeks, but there are also individual strategies you can employ to make your recovery from an anal fissure more comfortable and quick. Here are some at-home remedies to use during anal fissure treatment.

Tips to Avoid Anal Fissures

Anal fissures are the third most common condition of the rectum, but they don’t have to be. Taking measures to prevent the most common causes of anal fissure such as constipation and diarrhea by improving digestion and encouraging healthier bowels can also reduce your likelihood of developing anal fissures, and there are several ways that you can go about this.

Anal Pain

Get the PDF version of this article BEWARE: IT’S NOT ALWAYS JUST HEMORRHOIDS… Anal Pain is common, and commonly misdiagnosed. Most patients and many clinicians assume that a complaint of anal pain is synonymous with a diagnosis of hemorrhoids, especially when the pain is associated with the presence of bright red blood. A familiarity with

Anal Abscess & Perirectal Fistula

With the development of a new material and a relatively painless technique to close a perianal or perirectal fistula, it is useful to review the pathophysiology and treatment options for anal abscesses and anorectal fistulae. The new material, Surgisis®, is composed of po­­­rcine small intestinal submucosa ­rolled into a conical shape and inserted into an existing fistula (figure 1). This allows for tissue ingrowth and fistula closure.

Anal Fissure

Anal fissures are a common problem, bringing many patients to the colorectal surgeons’ office with complaints of anal pain. Most patients report feeling a tear, or a splitting sensation at the anus after a normal bowel movement, a bout of diarrhea, or after a particularly hard or large stool.